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1. My dog has diarrhea - what do I do?
2. My cat has been vomiting - what do I do?
3. How can I stop my cat from urinating outside of his/her litterbox?
4. Do I have to pay my bill today?
5. Do you board animals?
6. At what age can I start vaccinating my pets?
7. I've been told that giving vaccines to my pet may hurt them, is this correct?
8. Can I give my pet over the counter products for arthritis pain and/or allergies?
1. My dog has diarrhea - what do I do?
Dogs can have diarrhea for multiple reasons - some as simple as intestinal worms or parasites, others more severe like Parvovirus. Diarrhea accompanied by vomiting, lethargy or the presence of blood in the stool should ALWAYS be examined by a veterinarian. In some cases, withholding food for 24 hours, then feeding a bland diet of boiled hamburger or boiled chicken and rice with no other food or treats for a few days can help. Over the counter GI medications are generally not safe for your pet and you should consult your veterinarian prior to administering anything. You should also have a fresh stool sample checked to rule out intestinal worms and parasites.
2. My cat has been vomiting - what do I do?
Cats can vomit for a number of reasons. The most simple reason would be vomiting due to the presence of undigested hair. If the vomit consists of large amounts of hair, your cat may be having difficulty with hairballs. You can try using an over-the-counter hairball remedy or sometimes switching to a hairball controlling food will help. Some patients may show improvement when water is withheld for 12 hours and food is withheld for 24 hours, followed by smaller more frequent meals for a few days. If your cat vomits regularly or is suddenly unable to keep food down without he presence of hair it could be due to organ function decline, GI disease/obstruction or a number of other causes and should be examined by your veterinarian. It is not "normal" for a cat to vomit!
3. How can I stop my cat from urinating outside of his/her litterbox?
By far the most common cause of inappropriate elimination in cats is urinary tract disease. Examination and urinalysis by your veterinarian can diagnose this problem, which can often be cleared up by a simple course of antibiotics. Offering a high quality diet with an ideal balance of minerals reduces urinary tract disease and encouraging water intake helps with regular flushing of the urinary tract system. Cats often will drink more when water is fresh and typically enjoy running water; a cat drinking fountain can be a useful tool to help avoid urinary disease. Intact felines can urinate outside the box because of territorial marking behavior. Spaying or neutering may help, but once it becomes a learned behavior, behavioral instruction/modification may be needed.

Cats can become very picky when it comes to their bathroom habits. The litter box should be scooped daily and thoroughly cleaned weekly. As a general rule there should always be one more box available than the total number of cats in the household and boxes should be available on each floor of the home. Some cats may have substrate preferences and you may need to try different types or brands of litter. Most cats prefer the scoopable type of litter and typically do not like anything highly fragranced. Cats often do not appreciate covers over their litter boxes as they tend to hold in odors and does not allow the cat to fully be aware of their surroundings. Occasionally medications are needed to help control urinary behavioral problems - these would be administered under supervision of a veterinarian.

4. Do I have to pay my bill today?
Clinic policy is that payment is due at the time service is provided or products are purchased. We accept cash, check, Visa, Master Card and Discover Card. We also offer Care Credit - a health services credit card, which can be applied for here at the clinic or online in the comfort of your home. All other payment types available are at the discretion of the clinic Operations Manager and MUST be pre-arranged.
5. Do you board animals?
Because we have been contracted to provide the mandatory 7 day stray hold for the City of Green Bay we no longer offer general boarding services here at the clinic. We have separate facilities for our clinic patients and do not want to intermingle patients or boarders with our stray residents and, therefore, have decided to forego our boarding services. There are many wonderful facilities in the area that we work closely with and can recommend by request.
6. At what age should I start vaccinating my pets?
Puppies and kittens should start getting their vaccines at 8 weeks of age and typically receive boosters at 12 and 16 weeks. If you have an older pet who hasn't yet been vaccinated or you are unsure of their vaccine history, we recommend starting their vaccine series as soon as they become part of your family. Also, don't forget those pets whose vaccines may be overdue- we can get them back on schedule too.
7. I've been told that giving vaccines to my pet may hurt them, is this correct?
Some pets have mild reactions such as soreness at the injection site and grogginess. A few pets experience some flu-like symptoms, vomiting and diarrhea for 24-48 hours. Some pets experience true allergic reactions which are indicated primarily by swelling of the face, however this is very uncommon. This reaction is similar to a person with bee-sting allergies. Pets with facial swelling should be seen immediately by a veterinarian and require care to stop the reaction. Reactions such as those mentioned above can be prevented or managed with medications given prior to, or at the time of vaccination. In very rare cares, pets develop abnormal growths at the vaccine site. This is even more rare with the advancement of vaccine science as they develop safer versions of vaccines that have caused abnormal growths in the past. Some theories suggest that vaccinations cause pets to develop certain diseases later in life, but repeated studies have been unable to prove this link. It is MUCH more common for a pet to contract a potentially deadly disease, which they could have been vaccinated for, then for them to have an adverse vaccine reaction. Discuss any concerns and/or prior medical problems your pet has had with your veterinarian so they can help formulate an appropriate vaccine schedule catered to your pet and his/her exposure.
8. Can I give my pet over the counter products for arthritis pain and/or allergies?
Your veterinarian should be contacted before starting ANY medication as not all OTC medications are safe for your pet. Arthritic pain can be helped with aspirin on an as-needed basis, but you should NEVER use Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Aleve, etc. as these can be toxic. Aspirin itself, when used for prolonged periods, can cause joint cartilage destruction, GI ulcers and problems with the liver and kidneys. The recommended aspirin dose is based upon your pets weight, and should always be directed by a veterinarian.

The use of nutroceuticals such as Glucosamine, Chondroitin and MSM can also help with arthritis by providing the building blocks for healthy joints. Pets typically need to be on these supplements consistently for 4-6 weeks before any improvement is noticed, and they don't work for all pets. OTC joint supplements are not regulated by the FDA and can be extremely variable in efficacy. Speak to your veterinarian about proper dosages and recommendations for joint supplementation.

Over the counter allergy medications can be useful in pets, however some are very toxic so it is important to know exactly which ones your veterinarian recommends and in what dosages you should administer them to your pet. Benadryl (Diphenhydramine HC) is most commonly recommended, however Zyrtec and a few other medications can be used under the supervision of your veterinarian.

 

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121 Packerland Dr. Green Bay, WI 54303       phone: (920) 498-2808

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